Report: Viral video being shared by Ocasio-Cortez’s fans doesn’t tell the whole story

February 11, 2019 by Jerry McCormick

Report: Viral video being shared by Ocasio-Cortez’s fans doesn’t tell the whole story Rachael Warriner / Shutterstock.com

After one of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s first committee meetings, her liberal supporters held her up as a true hero, even sharing her questioning session so many times that it went viral.

But the clip that was passed around social media didn’t tell the whole story.

Bad Guys

Ocasio-Cortez’s entire line of questioning earlier this month revolved around how twisted the campaign finance laws have become in this country.

During her self-imposed “lightning round,” she exposed the ways that some politicians may choose to line their pockets while not actually doing anything for the people who voted them into office. And she constantly used the phrase “dark money” to refer to campaign funds that can’t be traced.

As an example of such, she spoke of PACs being set up to back a candidate by special interest groups, like “big pharma” or lobbyists for clean energy.

Ocasio-Cortez then stated that, after having been backed by these groups, a candidate could go on to deregulate the industries or otherwise create legislation that would benefit them. In turn, the candidate could still legally buy stock and get rich — all while knowing these industries would more than likely grow with these new laws or by being deregulated.

Her end game was to say that President Donald Trump was a very bad man.

What They Didn’t Show

What was not shown in the video, however, was the response by Brad Smith after Ocasio-Cortez was done.

Smith, who is the Chairman for the Institute for Free Speech, was quick to point out some errors in her questioning.

First and foremost, Smith stated that the percentage of “dark money” is very small compared to what Ocasio-Cortez led everyone to believe. According to Smith, less than 4 percent of the money in campaigns would fall into that category.

He also stated that official campaign funds cannot, in fact, be dark money. These funds must be disclosed.

Secondly, he tapped into the moral issue of her line of questioning: If individuals are, in fact, accepting money from these PACs and influencing legislation and regulation as a result, “then you might question yourselves.”

Point being: Ocasio-Cortez is trying to take down Trump — but she better start looking much closer at the individuals sharing a microphone with her.

The problems to which she pointed are running rampant throughout politics, especially in the Democrat Party. Ocasio-Cortez herself may even be a good place to start looking, especially with her massive push for green energy.

How many PACs have been or will be set up for Ocasio-Cortez by the renewable energy sector? How many of her fellow Democrats have big money PACs set up in their names by the very industries she mentioned during her rant?

Before throwing any more darts at this president, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, you and your fellow elected representatives would be well-served to look in the mirror and ask yourselves the very questions you put forth on that committee hearing.

You can start with the likes of Maxine Waters and Bob Menendez.