Story behind Republican governor’s prosecution forced into the open

This story was originally published by the WND News Center.

The ethically challenged prosecution of former Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens, an indictment released by the George Soros-linked St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner and later withdrawn, was pushed by two critics of Greitens – the estranged husband of a woman with whom he’d had a relationship and an official of a special interest group opposing him.

That’s according to an analysis from Just the News, an organization that spent years fighting for access to public documentation about the situation.

Greitens resigned amid the controversy brought on by allegations he tried to use a topless photo of an alleged victim to extort her, and the analysis reveals that even that woman suggested the photograph might not exist.

The documents were turned over to Just the News under a court order, and now show what machinations of the legal system took place that resulted, eventually, in misconduct findings against Gardner and a conviction for evidence tampering “against her chief investigator, former FBI agent William Tisaby.”

The report links to online postings of the documents.

It explained Gardner, who won her elections in 2016 and 2020 as a Democrat with massive funding from a PAC supported by George Soros, “rocked Missouri’s political world in 2018 when she indicted Greitens. “She alleged the then-governor had used a compromising cell phone photo to extort Katrina Sneed, the hairdresser with whom he had an extramarital affair. Greitens, a Republican who was married at the time, acknowledged the affair and was forced to resign, but denied the criminal charges,” the report explained.

But evidence now reveals that Sneed testified that the allegation “may have come from a dream she had,” and Gardner was forced to drop all charges and admit she never had material evidence there was a photograph – or that an extortion existed.

Just the News explains documentation in the case confirms that Sneed raised “concerns” about the existence of the photograph just four days before Gardner indicted Greitens based on the existence of that photograph.

The documents “were forced into public view after a three-year legal tussle by a lawsuit brought by Just the News Editor in Chief John Solomon under Missouri’s Sunshine Law,” the report said.

The case against Greitens was assembled largely based on complaints from Jeff Smith, who heads a Missouri housing group that benefited from a program Greitens brought to a halt, and Al Watkins, a lawyer for Katrina Sneed’s estranged husband Philip, the report said.

It was Watkins who first approached prosecutors, to talk about the Greitens affair, shortly after Philip Sneed got two $50,000 payments from Missouri Times publisher Scott Faughn and a mystery personage known only as “Skylar.”

Watkins said the payments were to cover Philip Sneed’s attorney bills.

Included in that information were emails from Sneed’s estranged wife about a relationship with Greitens before he ran for office.

The other source of information about Greitens was Smith, “a disgraced former Missouri state senator … who pleaded guilty to two federal felonies in 2009 in a campaign finance case,” the report said.

He was chief of the Missouri Workforce Housing Association, which boosted the state’s low-income housing tax credit, a program that Greitens dropped.

Smith sent to Tisaby a list of names of people who may have had complaints about Greitens.

Later came a claim Greitens incorrectly used a donor list from a veterans charity for campaign purposes.

Amid negative publicity about the Sneed situation, and a failed indictment over the use of the donor list, Greitens resigned.

The Missouri Ethics Commission fined the Greitens campaign $178,000 for two campaign finance violations and dismissed others, while concluding there was “no evidence” of wrongdoing by Greitens himself.

Solomon explained at Just the News the new documents fill in key details about Gardner’s legal pursuit of Greitens, including the political and personal forces seeking to damage Greitens.

“The Greitens prosecution has raised troubling questions about the weaponization of law enforcement to bring a case that was missing key evidence but still achieved a political outcome of forcing a duly elected official to resign,” Solomon said. “These documents show some of the external forces interacting with Gardner’s office at critical moments, contacts that the public would never have known about were it not for the Sunshine request we pursued.”

Kim Hermann, of the Southeastern Legal Foundation, added, “For years Kim Gardner tried to hide these records from the public, directly disobeying the Sunshine Law and direct orders from the court to release them to the public. It is unconscionable that a prosecuting attorney who is responsible for knowing the law and applying it fairly and properly would so blatantly disregard and disobey it. As Mr. Solomon’s lawsuit proves, the truth will always come out.”

WND has reported Gardner was among the first in a wave of local prosecutors whose campaigns were funded by George Soros, an extreme leftist.

The Missouri Bar’s ethics division already has accused Gardner of misconduct for prosecuting Greitens, and has recommended a reprimand. That report accused Gardner of misconduct through withholding and misrepresenting evidence and allowing her chief investigator to commit perjury.

Latest News