Kamala Harris, Cory Booker skip out on Senate duties to campaign

April 18, 2019 by Jerry McCormick

There is a question that has been looming for decades and needs to be answered … how can a presidential candidate who is already in office be expected to fulfill their duties while running for another office?

Apparently, not very well. 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), along with fellow candidate Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) have pretty much quit even trying.

Both Harris and Booker have skipped out on a full fifth of the Senate votes since announcing their 2020 presidential campaigns, according to the AP.

Leading the Pack

Campaigning for president is a full-time job, which is why many Americans believe elected officials should resign their current position before running for another.

Amazingly, there are only a half dozen states in the entire country with resign-to-run laws on the books, with Texas probably being the most stringent.

Both Harris and Booker have missed a total of 16 votes each (out of 77) since announcing their candidacy for president.

Bernie Sanders is next up, having missed seven votes so far.

Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand and Amy Klobuchar have each missed three, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren has missed only one Senate vote.

A missed vote here and there is understandable, but to be missing 10%, as is the case for Sanders, or 20%, as is the case for Booker and Harris, is simply inexcusable.

The people of California and New Jersey did not elect these individuals to run for president… they voted for them to represent them in Congress.

Not Doing Their Jobs

This has long been a problem in presidential races and it is something that needs to be addressed and fixed ASAP.

The single most important aspect of the senators’ jobs is to be present for voting.

While Harris has been rather silent on the topic, Booker was very upfront after announcing his campaign. He flat-out said his top priority from that point forward was going to be campaigning across the country for president.

So, for the next two years, Californians and the residents of New Jersey will only be getting partial representation in Senate votes. That really doesn’t seem fair.