Roger Stone asks judge to dismiss charges brought against him by Mueller

April 14, 2019 by Jerry McCormick

Roger Stone was collateral damage, and everyone knows it. But he may not need a pardon from President Donald Trump to get out of his current debacle.

On Friday, Stone asked the judge presiding over his case for a complete dismissal of all charges against him.

Stone also requested a complete and unredacted copy of Robert Mueller’s report to aid in his defense.

Selective Prosecution

We all now know the Mueller report was nothing more than a hit against Donald Trump and his associates.

The investigation was supposed to find collusion, but it came up empty.

In all honesty, Mueller probably knew this very early on but decided to try to make lemonade out of lemons by conducting tangential investigations into anyone tied to President Trump.

Instead of collusion, he got indictments on Paul Manafort, Michael Flynn, Michael Cohen, and Roger Stone.

None of these indictments, however, had anything at all to do with collusion — which has Stone’s attorneys skeptical of the charges against their client.

“Only by reviewing the full, unredacted Mueller report can Roger Stone be assured of his rights to due process, to compulsory process, to know the exculpatory evidence, to determine whether or not he is being selectively prosecuted,” Stone’s attorneys said in a statement.

Stone and Assange

Stone also has another thing going for him ahead of his own trial: Julian Assange has been arrested.

Court filings tied Stone to Assange through WikiLeaks.

That relationship was debunked by Assange himself, but authorities apparently didn’t buy it.

Now, Stone is hoping to get Assange to testify during his trial — which may actually be possible now that Assange is in custody and not in the comfort of a foreign embassy.

If Assange were to testify and confirm under oath that he never actually met Stone and never had communications with him, it would put a rather large kink in the case against Stone.

Looks like he won’t be needing that pardon, after all.