Daniel Krauthammer discusses his late father’s legacy and final book with Fox’s Bret Baier

December 4, 2018 by Ben Baird

There weren’t any state funerals to honor the passing of the late political theorist, syndicated columnist and frequent Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer in June. Yet, much like the 41st U.S. president is currently being honored for his character, Charles Krauthammer was an extraordinary man whose incredible legacy is worth remembering.

His son, Daniel Krauthammer, has immortalized his father’s legacy by completing the conservative commentator’s final book, The Point of It All: A Lifetime of Great Loves and Endeavors. Krauthammer’s son sat down in the very seat his father once occupied on Fox News’ “Special Report with Bret Baier” to discuss the book and elaborate on Charles’ extraordinary life.

Watch below:

Daniel Krauthammer reflects on his father’s legacy

Charles Krauthammer’s son Daniel has compiled a book of his late father’s work called ‘The Point of It All: A Lifetime of Great Loves and Endeavors.’ FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service dedicated to delivering breaking news as well as political and business news.

Unfinished business

“It’s the right place to [be],” Daniel Krauthammer said of the late contributor’s seat across from Baier. 

Krauthammer said that his father asked him to finish the book after learning that he was in the final stages of cancer. “When the final diagnosis came he entrusted me to finish it for him. And since he passed in June that’s been my absolute, number one priority,” Krauthammer said.

Krauthammer is credited as the editor in The Point of It All, which was released on Tuesday. He told Baier that he penned the introduction and epilogue, and that the closing section is a copy of the epilogue he read at his father’s funeral.

“It was a difficult decision to put that in because it’s obviously very personal and close to my heart,” he said of his choice to include the very intimate dedication. “I wanted the world to know how wonderful he was and how extraordinary he was, and that was the best way I knew how.”

Baier pointed out that Charles would rarely “open up” about his family life, but that the new book includes intimate details which previously were undisclosed by the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist. Krauthammer agreed.

“As you say, he was very private, especially about me and my mother, and I love him for that. He was not trying to make us a part of his profession, his career.” Krauthammer’s son said he “thought long and hard” about how much to reveal about his father’s personal life.

Cutting through the noise

The Special Report host brought up a November 1992 column in which Charles argued that George H.W. Bush was not a failed president. Bush would be remembered fondly by historians for doing the “two things,” that destiny required of him, the Washington Post column read.

“History called him to do two things — close out the Cold War and thwart the ambitions of a reckless tyrant [Saddam Hussein] in the Persian Gulf,” Charles wrote in the column. “Bush did both rather well.”

Charles concluded that the opinion polls and contemporary news reports would be forgotten one day, and historians would have the final say on the leadership of the 41st president. “The voter’s judgement is not to be confused with history’s,” he noted 26 years ago.

“What’s amazing about Charles is he could always cut through the noise,” Baier reflected. “Now, looking back, everyone is saying this — saying this presidency is larger than the 38 percent he received in that election. But he said it back in 1992.”

“It feels like it could be written today,” Daniel agreed.

Like father, like son

Baier closed the segment by simply asking, “What was it like having Charles as your dad?”

“Wonderful,” Krauthammer responded. Despite many challenges, “he lived such a full and vibrant life,” Daniel explained.

Looking back, he said he realized “just how lucky he was” to have Charles as a father. And Americans were just as fortunate to know Charles Krauthammer, even if he was taken away too soon.

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