Hospital system tells non-‘woke’ patients to ‘make other plans’

This story was originally published by the WND News Center.

Are you “non-woke,” not particularly politically correct, and certainly not on board with the extreme ideology of contemporary America where men can simply say they are women and you are supposed to call them “Miss”?

One hospital system is kicking you to the curb.

A report at Just the News documents how Mass General Brigham, a “wealthy” healthcare system in Massachusetts, is imposing a “code of conduct” on patients.

The code covers not only “verbal threats” and “vulgar words” but also threatens patients with action for “offensive comments about others’ race, accent, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or other personal traits.”

“Unwelcome words” are not allowed.

“MGB warns that it may ask [patients] to ‘make other plans for their care in response to some violations,” the report confirmed.

They also might be banned from any future care that is not an emergency.

The hospital declares, “Words or actions that are disrespectful, racist, discriminatory, hostile, or harassing are not welcome.”

Just the News revealed that the code “gives no minimum number of violations before a patient would be kicked out or banned…”

The bull’s eye is on a wide range of patients now, according to Do No Harm, an advocacy group that fights “wokism.”

The group warned failing to use preferred pronouns could be considered to be harassment and disputing the existence of systemic racism could, in fact, be determined to be “racist.”

“Do No Harm noted that one of MGB’s founding members and Harvard Med’s training hospital, Brigham and Women’s, launched a pilot last year that explicitly granted ‘preferential care based on race’ to redress past wrongs, even while acknowledging it might be illegal,” Just the News reported.

Officials, however, refused to reveal whether “misgendering,” or using a person’s legal name instead of a “transgender” identifier they have chosen, would count as a violation.

“The code of conduct is an internal framework that will be used to evaluate each potential incident,” spokesman Mark Murphy told Just the News by email.

“Patients who repeatedly act in disrespectful or discriminatory ways may be asked to make other arrangements for care,” he said. He said there could be considered “extenuating circumstances, such as emotional distress or severe pain.”

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