Kamala Harris applauds California governor’s decision to halt use of death penalty

March 14, 2019 by Jerry McCormick

It’s official: Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), has quit supporting the death penalty.

After defending capital punishment as the attorney general of California, the 2020 hopeful is now supporting California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s executive order to end the death penalty in his state.

Defending the Death Penalty

It might be understandable for Harris to have switched her views on the death penalty if she’d defended it decades ago. But she stood by capital punishment as recently as 2015, when she argued against an inmate who was trying to get off the chopping block.

Ernest Jones had spent 25 years on death row before successfully convincing a judge that the time he spent waiting amounted to a cruel and unusual punishment.

But the judge’s ruling didn’t just apply to Jones: his order rendered the death penalty in the entire state of California unconstitutional.

As California’s attorney general, Kamala Harris led the appeal of the case — and won.

Flipping the Script

Now, as one of more than a dozen Democrat candidates running for president against Donald Trump, Harris knows she needs to be about as far left as possible to gain support.

We have already seen what happens to moderate Democrats in office these days, and it is not pretty — so it’s no surprise she’s switched her tune.

And Harris has not exactly been shy about taking on a very aggressive liberal agenda.

She has already stated she supports reparations, even though her family once owned slaves, and she’s come out to support recent legislation that would allow late-term abortion.

Harris is also very much in favor of assisting the millions of immigrants who are in this country illegally.

Now, she is backing the executive order by Gov. Newsom to end the death penalty after having fought previously to keep the punishment intact in her state. But other than her tweet of approval, Harris’ office has not commented about her flip-flop on the death penalty.

I guess it’s hard to defend your opinions when they were so different just four short years ago.