‘Bombshell!’: FBI ‘paying people to steal 2020 presidential election’

Igor Danchenko, the main source for the details of the debunked “Steele dossier” of accusations created by Democrats against Donald Trump while he was a candidate for president, and used even after he held office, was a paid FBI informant, according to new documentation, prompting fresh outrage from Trump.

Danchenko is facing a trial on five counts of lying to the FBI during that relationship, and the court case is scheduled to be in federal court in a few weeks.

But there are appearing new details about the situation in which he apparently fed faked information to former British agent Christopher Steele, who compiled it into a dossier which then was used against President Trump.

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The dossier was part of the scheme created by Democrats – with the willing participation of some elements in the Department of Justice and FBI – that wildly claimed Trump’s 2016 campaign was colluding with Russia.

The matter was under investigation for years and eventually debunked.

A report by John Solomon at Just the News said the prosecution of the Danchenko case, led by special prosecutor John Durham, now has confirmed that the FBI paid the Russian business operator “as a confidential human source” during the bureau’s “investigation” of the Trump campaign “even though it had prior concerns” that he was tied to Moscow’s intelligence agencies.

The report explained Durham convinced a judge for the upcoming trial to unseal a motion that showed Danchenko was in the pay of the FBI for more than three years, until the end of 2020 when he was fired for his lies.

“In March 2017, the FBI signed the defendant up as a paid confidential human source of the FBI. The FBI terminated its source relationship with the defendant in October 2020. As alleged in further detail below, the defendant lied to FBI agents during several of these interviews,” Durham’s filing confirmed.

The report explained the significance, in that the FBI had fired Steele, who compiled his dossier for the Hillary Clinton campaign, in 2016 for contacting the media. Then within months, it hired Steele’s “primary informer” to work with agents “even after determining some of Danchenko’s statements in the Steele dossier were uncorroborated or exaggerated.”

In that so-called “Russiagate” investigation, it’s now known that evidence was fabricated before it was submitted to a federal court to obtain permission for the FBI to spy on the Trump campaign. That court later voided some of the warrants it had authorized because of the false statements.

Solomon reported, “Even more stunning, Durham confirmed that the FBI had concerns about Danchenko’s ties to Russian intelligence a decade earlier, opening up a counterintelligence probe on him after learning he was trying to buy classified information from the Obama administration.”

Durham’s own explanation was that: “As has been publicly reported, the defendant was the subject of an FBI counterintelligence investigation from 2009 to 2011. In late 2008, while the defendant was employed by a prominent think tank in Washington, D.C., the defendant engaged two fellow employees about whether one of the employees might be willing or able in the future to provide classified information in exchange for money.”

The document charges that Danchenko knew people “who would be willing to pay money in exchange for classified information,” after one of the “employees” suggested he might be able to enter the Barack Obama administration and gain access to those documents.

“Based on this information, the FBI initiated a ‘preliminary investigation’ into the defendant. The FBI converted its investigation into a ‘full investigation after learning that the defendant (1) had been identified as an associate of two FBI counterintelligence subjects and (2) had the previous contact with the Russian Embassy and known Russian intelligence officers,” Durham explained.

Durham said the investigation was closed because the FBI “incorrectly” thought Danchenko had left the country.

Durham wants to use at Danchenko’s trial evidence of his lies – including those that are not part of the actual indictment because they “show a pattern” of deception.

Specifically, the situation addressed Steele’s dossier claims about wild activities by Trump at a Russian hotel, which evidence shows never happened.

“Prosecutors will provide evidence that Danchenko never received such information and plan to introduce testimony that members of the Moscow hotel staff never made any claims about Trump’s behavior such as those the Steele dossier attributed to them,” Just the News said.

“This is a bombshell!” Trump exclaimed on his TruthSocial platform.

“The FBI was paying people to steal the 2020 Presidential Election from me. There has never been anything like this in the History of our Country—and then, we are supposed to trust them with documents that they illegally took from my home, Mar-a-Lago? They are not trustworthy.

“Remember, the leadership of the FBI also tried to steal the 2016 Election from me for Crooked Hillary, but the Agents of the FBI revolted against Comey and his corrupt gang of thugs at the top.”

A report at the Washington Examiner characterized Danchenko’s statements as “wild claims.”

That report noted Durham also wants to introduce evidence about an email to Danchenko’s former employer in which he advised the employer, when needed, to “fabricate sources of information.”

Steele’s compilation of accusations against Trump was created after he was hired by Fusion GPS, which was doing opposition research for the Clinton campaign, after being hired by Perkins Coie and Marc Elias, the general counsel for her campaign.

In essence, the Clinton campaign was working with politicized elements in the FBI and DOJ to accuse Trump of colluding with Russia, all the while basing the allegations on information from a discredited Russian source.

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