2 young athletes the latest to ‘die suddenly’

This story was originally published by the WND News Center.

A former NFL defensive tackle and a champion motorcycle racer are the latest examples of apparently healthy people dying suddenly amid evidence the COVID-19 mRNA shots are causing serious heart damage at a rate exponentially higher than for previous vaccines.

There was no report that 35-year-old Keith Farmer, a four-time British champion, and 45-year-old Adrian Dingle, who spent five seasons with the San Diego Chargers, took the COVID vaccine.

However, citing the available scientific evidence, prominent cardiologists – including Dr. Peter McCullough and Dr. Aseem Malhotra – believe the best explanation for the “sudden and unexpected” deaths and cardiac events in otherwise healthy people is the COVID-19 vaccines.

Dingle apparently showed no signs of ill health when he recently was with former Charger Marcellus Wiley, a former ESPN host.

“RIP to my teammate @AdrianDingle,” Wiley tweeted. “We were just hanging, laughing, swapping war stories, and talking family. Rest easy big dog!”

Mississippi State football player Sam Westmoreland recently was found dead just days before his 19th birthday. His cause of death was under investigation.

McCullough, in a video interview with WND in which he talked about the threat to his medical credentials for allegedly purveying “misinformation,” pointed out that in the past, long before the COVID vaccines, athletes who died suddenly typically were diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an abnormal thickening of the heart, or premature heart blockage.

Now, athletes are thoroughly screened to rule out those conditions.

McCullough noted that peer-reviewed literature shows that vaccines cause myocarditis. He cited a U.K. study that found about 100 fatal cases of myocarditis linked to the vaccine. And he referenced a case report published in August in the journal Archives of Pathology that found a connection between a second dose of the Pfizer vaccine and myocarditis in two adolescents. A case report by South Korean researchers presented the autopsy findings of a 22-year-old man who developed chest pain five days after the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine and died seven hours later.

“When someone dies and the family doesn’t come out and say anything, or doctors don’t come out and say anything, it’s a reasonable assumption that it was the vaccine until proven otherwise,” McCullough told WND.

He referenced the case of the 17-year-old daughter of Rep. Sean Casten, D-Ill., who died in her sleep in June. The congressman had indicated in a Twitter post before her death that she had been fully vaccinated. But the family said in a statement, “We don’t know what caused the arrhythmia, and likely never will.”

Dr. James Olsson, a Johns Hopkins-trained biomedical and cancer researcher, keeps track of the reported “died suddenly” incidents via Twitter. And there’s a “died suddenly” page on Facebook.

Malhotra, who was one of the first to take the COVID-19 vaccine and promote it on British television, has published a study tying “sudden deaths” to the COVID-19 vaccines. He said in a video posted on Twitter that the COVID mRNA vaccine likely is a “primary cause in all unexpected cardiac arrests, heart attacks, strokes, cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure since 2021 until proven otherwise.”

He called for a suspension of the shots, arguing the evidence the risk of harm is greater than any benefit.

McCullough’s remarks were part of an hourlong conversation with WND in which he also weighed in on:

  • The Atlantic article calling for pandemic “amnesty”;
  • What the latest studies find about the risk of myocarditis in young people from the vaccines;
  • The ineffectiveness of the new bivalent booster and the indication that it increases the risk of infection;
  • The CDC adding the COVID mRNA vaccine to the childhood vaccine schedule and how the move has put health freedom and the health of children on the ballot in the upcoming midterms;
  • What the new Congress might do to bring accountability and reform in the wake of the pandemic.

McCullough, along with Yale University Medical School emeritus professor Dr. Harvey Risch and others, recently launched The Wellness Company, a membership-based, holistic, prevention-oriented approach to health care through telemedicine and, eventually, through in-person consultation as well.

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